Medical Screening Recommendations*

Adult Preventive Care

Women

Breast Cancer Breast Self-Exam (BSE) monthly
At age 40- Mammography/Clinical Breast Exam every 1-2 years
Age 70+ discuss with doctor if positive family history, consult your physician for appropriate screening schedule
Cervical Cancer Age 21 or within 3 years of onset of sexual activity, every 3 years
Osteoporosis Age 60, routine screening for women at risk for osteoporotic fractures.
Age 65+ routine screening for all women If positive family history, consult your physician for screening schedule.
Colon Cancer Age 50, every 3-5 years.
After age 80, at physician and patient discretion. If positive family history consult your physician for screening schedule

Men

Prostate Cancer Age 50, discuss PSA (prosthetic specific antigen test) and DRE (digital rectal exam)
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Between ages 65-75, a one-time screening by ultrasound for men who have ever smoked.
Colon Cancer Age 50, every 3-5 years.
Age 80, at physician and patient discretion. If positive family history, consult your physician for screening schedule

Women and Men

Diabetes (Type II) Screening All adults with hypertension and hyperlipidemia should be screened.
Lipid Screening Age 20, a complete fasting lipid profile every 5 years.
Obesity Screening Discuss BMI (Body Mass Index) at preventive health exam
Tuberculosis Screening Tuberculin skin test (PPD); screen high risk at any age
Blood Pressure Screening Age 16-64, at least every 2 years; age 65+ every 1-2 years
HIV Testing Periodic and Appropriate
*Please check with your physician regarding your requirements.
based on your medical and family history, You may require these screenings at an earlier age or with greater frequency.

IMMUNIZATIONS
Why Do Adults Need Vaccines?

Some adults incorrectly assume that the vaccines they received as children will protect them for the rest of their lives. Generally this is true, except that:

  • Some adults were never vaccinated as children
  • Newer vaccines were not available when some adults were children
  • Immunity can begin to fade over time
  • As we age, we become more susceptible to serious disease caused by common infections (e.g., flu, pneumococcus)

Vaccines Recommended for Adults Depending On Their Medical Conditions

Women and Men

Age

Vaccine

9-49 years
50-64 years
≥65 years
Human Papilloma Vaccine ( 9-26 yrs)
Series of Three Injections 0-2-6 months **
   
Meningococcal Vaccine (Medical Risk Dependent and/or College Freshmen; Consult MD)
Hepatitis B Vaccine ( All ages) Series of Three Injections 0-1-6 months
Tdap Tetanus Diptheria and Pertussis Vaccine ( 12 yrs) Every 10 years
TB Skin Testing Periodically
Hepatitis A Vaccine Series of Two Injections 0-6 months (esp. for travelers)
Flu Vaccine Annually Medical Risk Dependent Consult MD
Herpes Zoster Vaccine   (>60yrs) Consult MD  

** FDA Approved For Women Only